Recognizing Depression in Men, From the Harvard Mental Health Letter

Boston, MA (PRWEB) June 03, 2011 About 10% to 17% of men will develop major depression at some point in their lives. Yet many men are reluctant to co...


Boston, MA (PRWEB) June 03, 2011

About 10% to 17% of men will develop major depression at some point in their lives. Yet many men are reluctant to convey their feelings and seek help when they are in despair.

In men, depression often masquerades as some other problemsuch as drinking too much, becoming argumentative, or even doing a lot of overtime at work. As a result, the problem may go undiagnosedand untreated.

The June 2011 issue of The Harvard Mental Health Letter examines how depression may manifest in men, how it is diagnosed, and what treatment options exist.

Complicating matters further, patterns of symptoms in men are different from those in women. Both men and women have low mood when depressed. But women are more likely to gain weight when depressed; men are more likely to lose weight. Women become more anxious when depressed; men become more obsessive and compulsive. Women feel less energetic; men become agitated.

Dr. Michael Miller, editor in chief of the Harvard Mental Health Letter, notes that treatment is the same for both sexestalking with a clinician about problems and taking antidepressants for symptoms. With time, many men should find relief.

Read the full-length article: Recognizing depression in men

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